Animal Aid

COSMETIC BAN: PROOF THAT CONSUMER POWER DOES WORK

Posted 16 November 1998

Animal Aid welcomes today's government announcement that there is now a voluntary ban in the UK on the testing of cosmetic products and ingredients. The national animal rights campaigning organisation is opposed to all animal testing on both humane and medical grounds, and hopes that the cosmetic ban will pave the way towards an end to animal experimentation.

Said Animal Aid director Andrew Tyler:

"The government announcement marks the dawn of a new era for both people and animals. Animal experiments cause great suffering and results of these tests cannot be trusted due to species differences. Replacing animal testing with modern, humane research methods will benefit both animals suffering in research labs and the health conscious consumer who wishes to know that products are safe."

Animal Aid is now urging consumers to write to global cosmetic companies, as well as to manufacturers of household products like washing up liquid and cleaning fluid. The group is calling for a boycott of any manufacturer still involved in animal testing.

Said Mr. Tyler

"It is most encouraging that the UK government has been prepared to take a lead on this issue. The international nature of modern companies means that many will still be continuing to test overseas so that not all products on shop shelves will be cruelty-free. However, with continued consumer pressure, we can build on today's announcement and continue campaigning to ensure that the ban becomes a worldwide one."

Notes to Editors

  • More information: Andrew Tyler, Becky Smith on 01732 364546. After hours: 0421 326329
    • 1,319 animals were used in cosmetic experiments in the UK during 1997
    • 2,026 animals were used for the testing of household products in 1997, as well as 7,525 for food additives and foodstuffs; 53,786 for agricultural chemicals, and 76,158 for industrial chemicals.
    • Overall, 2,573,088 animals were used in procedures 'likely to cause.. pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm' carried out on living animals during 1997.

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