Forty campaigners hold vigil at Norfolk turkey slaughterhouse

Posted on the 16th December 2016

Carrying photographs of turkeys and banners which read “Stop the Slaughter”, forty campaigners from Animal Aid and the Save Movement held a peaceful vigil outside the Bernard Matthews abattoir in Great Witchingham, Norwich.

Demonstrators outside the Bernard Matthews slaughterhouse

Attendees filmed Christmas turkeys tightly packed into crates on the back of trucks, which arrived at the site for slaughter.

Bernard Matthews sparked controversy earlier this week, when an undercover investigation of a free-range turkey farm operated by the company was released by Animal Aid, which showed animals with bloodied and infected head wounds.

Says Luke Steele, Farming and Slaughter Campaigns Manager, Animal Aid:

“Animal Aid thanks the forty campaigners who joined our peaceful vigil yesterday. Attendees documented the fate suffered by thousands of Christmas turkeys, who were delivered to the slaughterhouse tightly packed into crates on the back of lorries.

“We want to show caring people everywhere that by simply swapping turkey for a meat-free alternative this Christmas, the suffering of animals can be prevented. Never before has it been so easy to enjoy a cruelty-free festive meal.”

Says Rehana Sara, Co-Ordinator for Save Movement UK & Europe:

“A staggering 6 million turkeys are slaughtered in the UK in the run-up to Christmas, a fact that’s far removed from the message of peace, love and celebration that everyone hopes for at this time of year.

“The Save Movement works tirelessly throughout the year the raise public awareness of the scale of needless animal suffering and death for human consumption, and welcomes the support of Animal Aid in this joint effort.”

Photographs taken of turkeys in trucks entering the slaughterhouse

Photographs of the Animal Aid and Save campaigners

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