Update on the racing industry’s consultation process on the future of the whip in racing 

Posted on the 27th May 2022

With an update on the racing industry’s review on the use of the whip in racing imminent, Animal Aid are reiterating  our stance on the use of the whip in racing.  

As part of this review into the future of the whip in racing, Animal Aid’s racing consultant Dene Stansall, has previously given a presentation to those involved in the consultant process explaining why the only acceptable outcome of the consultation would be a total ban on the use of the whip in racing. This was the culmination of  over 15 years of campaigning on this issue. In addition, an academic paper, published in 2020, outlined how horses suffer comparable pain to humans, based on the morphology of their skin. This evidence can only lead to one rational conclusion – that the use of the whip should be banned.

Animal Aid feel that the only acceptable change to the current policies surrounding the whip in racing would be a total ban – except for extremely rare occasions when the safety of humans or horses is at risk. Any other measure such as decreasing the number of times jockeys are permitted to use the whip, or increasing the penalties for those breaking the whip rules, is simply not an adequate solution.   

As well as this ban, we believe the racing industry should disqualify any jockey who breaks any rules, meaning they lose their placement and winnings. 

There is sufficient, up-to-date scientific evidence to prove that the whip does not improve a jockey’s chance of winning – and that horses have the same ability to experience pain as people.  It is high time decisive action was taken to ban the use of the whip in racing. Animal Aid once again call on the racing industry to do the right thing.  

Find out more about our campaign to ban the whip

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